Macrosick

Twiropa

November 22, 2004

BY MARTY GARNER


Nobody will ever be able to accuse Macrosick of not putting forth an effort. The New Orleans group opened for TV on the Radio Monday night at Twiropa in what was easily the most bombastic local show I’ve ever seen. The group had their entire image down. All white suits. Big hair. Gigantic video screen with no less than three remote DVD players to control it. Effects-drenched vocals. The sheer magnitude of it
all was impressive. My friends and I spent time
between songs speculating as to just how a group of guys in their early twenties managed to afford such a huge setup.

But that’s not what I’m here to review. Like other
New Orleans group The Public, Macrosick drew heavily from eighties dance rock. Unlike The Public, Macrosick managed to take their influences and create a new sound out of them. Their analog instrumentation was well done, but what set Macrosick apart were their two digital players, keyboardist/programmer Paul Meany
and “live visual manipulator” Jonathan Odom. The blips and bleeps coming through Twiropa’s PA combined with the amazing visuals on the twenty foot screen behind the band created a sense of other-worldliness that distinguished the group from damn near every other band making music.

Many new groups (Interpol, Franz Ferdinand) try to incorporate a “total art” theme to what they do, but Macrosick managed to execute the artistic concept while still being at least a bit genuine. Their work, while Dadaist both visually and musically, conveyed a sense of loneliness and despair.

There is no doubting Macrosick paid close attention to the works of their musical influences (Lead singer/programmer Adam LaClave does that whole “I‘m jerking from side to side to convey apathy when I obviously am trying very hard“ thing that Ian Curtis used to do). What made them important to a scene as crumbly as ours was the originality they managed to forge through their influences. They had a very
clear vision and the talent (and apparently financial backing) to succeed in the indie-dance world.



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